LOW DENSITY LAYER - LDL

HELMETS ARE TOO HARD

At Kali Protectives, we believe all helmets (including our own) are overbuilt. They are designed to meet regulations written to protect a rider from a worst-case scenario crash, such as a skull fracture. In the case of CPSC, that means a helmet must transfer less than 300g's to the head. That doesn't take into account for mild traumatic brain injuries (mTBI), such as concussions.

However, studies show we can experience a concussion at much lower g-forces (less than 100g), or even lower if rotational torque forces are involved. In fact, 80% of bicycle crashes occur at or below 100g’s. 

So, why aren't helmets softer? That's due to the testing regulations and materials. Although EPS foam can be made to be very soft, in order to pass these regulations, the helmet foam density and shell rigidity have to be increased (made harder) to withstand those really big hits. The trade-off is that the helmet is then too hard to address the small hits.

SOFTER FOR SAFETY

At Kali Protectives, we design our helmets to use the softest EPS foam possible and still pass the testing standards. But even then, our helmets are still too hard and do nothing to address rotational impact forces. 

Our Low Density Layer (LDL) padding system addresses both low-g and rotational impact forces by placing soft gel pads throughout the interior of the helmet. These specially designed viscoelastic gel pads are softer than EPS and can compress and shear in all directions. As a result, they reduce rotational impact forces by 25% and low-g linear impact forces by 30%.

By combining our Composite Fusion in-molded shells with our soft LDL gel padding, our helmets are designed to address a wider range of impacts. 

ROTATIONAL IMPACT TESTING

Helmet 1 - NO LDL 

Helmet 2 - WITH LDL 

 

LDL EQUIPPED HELMETS

Full Face

  • Shiva 2.0 Carbon
  • Shiva 2.0
  • Alpine

Mountain

  • Interceptor
  • Maya 2.0
  • Alchemy

Road

  • Tava
  • Therapy